The Roughhouses Mix Silliness With Rock & Roll For A Fresh, All-Ages Sound On ‘Posie Bites’

Much like the titular tot in “Posie Bites,” the new song from The Roughhousers will chomp onto you and never let go. The latest cut (bite?) from the group – featuring television and film legend Grey DeLisle and Eddie Clendening of Broadways’ Million Dollar Quartet – sees Eddie spin a tale about the titular Posie, a terror who will “twist your arm / and pull your hair / she will grab you by your underwear.” All the while, Grey dances while sporting a pair of teeth that would give any dentist nightmares.

“Posie Bites” shows why The Roughhousers should be playing on the car’s stereo, whether you’re driving to Viva Las Vegas or taking the kids to summer day camp. The music is exceptional, courtesy of Eddie’s twang (honed both on Broadway and as part of his group, the Blue Ribbon Boys) and Grey’s dynamic voice. The Roughhousers also boast some titans of the underground:  Deke Dickerson (Ecco-Fonics), Carl Sonny Leyland (Big Sandy and The Fly Rite Boys), Murry Hammond (Old 97’s), and DJ Bonebrake (a founding member of X and The Knitters.)

(Robyn Von Swank)

Though Grey’s vocals aren’t on “Posie Bites,” the celebrated voice actress (Scooby-Doo, The Simpsons, Batman) shines on tracks like “Azucar,” “Baby Brother,” and “Princess Mike” – the latter being the title track to their upcoming album.

“The Roughhousers were born out of the misery and boredom of the pandemic lockdowns,” Eddie tells HollywoodLife. “To be able to just put all that off to the side and get silly, act and think like a kid for a little while. To be able to stop taking the day so seriously and just sing a song about boogers, or space aliens, or an ornery little sister, or whatever else, just made for such a nice, much-needed release.”

Eddie shares what went into the upcoming Princess Mike album, why Grey and he are drawn to the roots/Americana sound, and why this music is perfect for kids and the “kids at heart.”

(Neuman Mannis)

HollywoodLife: “Posie Bites” is the latest single from your upcoming album, set for an Oct. 7 release. What was the biggest challenge in writing an album of all-original, all-ages music?  

Eddie: I think the biggest challenge for The Roughhousers is always finding ways to make classic Rock & Roll sounding music still feel fresh and exciting. Especially when the goal is to appeal to the ears of all generations. From the onset of this band, we knew we wanted to take the sounds of past artists we love and apply them to silly themes that kids can relate to and have fun with. Grey is great about latching onto hilarious moments and jokes while hanging out with her kids and turning them into catchy hooks we can set to music.

On the flip side of that, what would you say has been one of the most gleeful moments in recording this album? I imagine there was a moment of giggle-fits (at least, I hope so.)  

Absolutely, The Roughhousers were born out of the misery and boredom of the pandemic lockdowns. To be able to just put all that off to the side and get silly, act, and think like a kid for a little while. To be able to stop taking the day so seriously and just sing a song about boogers, or space aliens, or an ornery little sister, or whatever else, just made for such a nice, much-needed release.

The album features some heavyweights of the underground – Deke Dickerson, DJ Bonebrake, Murry Hammond, and Carl Sonny Leyland. What drew you to this alt-country/roots rock’n’roll sound? 

Well, Grey and I have existed in this Roots/Americana world for a long time. So we are lucky to call these guys all friends, and sometimes bandmates. The only way this project was ever going to work was with the help of our friends. It’s important to have people in the room who are comfortable together, professional, but also know how to laugh and have a good time. The music we’re attempting is all about feel. If we aren’t actually having fun, it’s gonna be evident from the minute the songs kick in. I think each track we came together on shows clear evidence of that rapport, and of the fun we all had doing it.

How would you describe a Roughhouser fan? Like, what kind of listener should pre-save this album? 

You know that’s a tricky question. It’s not really helpful to just say we hope everyone hears us and becomes a fan. But that truly was the ultimate goal. Hence the variety of sounds, and of songs. I think if anything I hope our fans are kids, if not in the literal sense, then kids at heart. We just want to make everyone feel ok to be silly and have a good time.




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